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Google building two Android Wear Smartwatches integrating Google Assistant

By |July 7th, 2016|PRODUCT RUMORS, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES|

Speaking to Android Police, a reliable source has told us that Google is currently building two Android Wear devices – possibly Nexus-branded – for release some time after the latest Nexus phones are announced. One watch will be larger, sportier, and more fully-featured (LTE, GPS, heart rate), the other will be smaller and lack the aforementioned mobile data and GPS.

This rumor a confidence level of 9 out of 10;We are extremely confident Google is in the process of prototyping these in-house Wear devices, and have confirmation of their existence from multiple sources. We are subtracting a point from our confidence because of the ongoing development occurring for these devices, and the possibility that they may change or that one or both may be cancelled (or delayed), as well as the fact that we are unable to share our primary source information for this post.

There also remains some ambiguity about the codenames I will use for these watches, and whether or not these names are currently being used, so consider them nothing more than easy ways to refer back to either device at this point.

The evidence

As I said, we are unable to share any direct evidence of the existence of these devices at this time. However, because of the quality of our source, we feel confident in publishing information about these devices, including descriptions of their respective appearances. To ensure we are clear on one thing before we start: the hero image of this post is 100% a fabrication [hopefully obviously, because my talentless ass made it] and has no resemblance to either watch. So, let’s get started.

Both watches have full circular displays. We do not believe either will have “flat tires.” Let’s start with the larger watch, which we believe to be codenamed Angelfish.

Angelfish bears some resemblance to the current Moto 360 and LG’s Urbane 2nd Edition LTE, but is distinct from both. The design has visible lugs, with a smooth housing shape that curves where the watch band meets the body. It does not have the stark circular “puck” shape of Motorola’s 360, nor the rather angular lugs or multi-piece design of the Urbane LTE. This gives the watch a subdued but sporty look. Angelfish has three buttons. Looking at the watch face, one large circular crown button is centered along the right side of the body, with two smaller and shorter circular buttons above and below it. It is unclear what these secondary buttons are for at this time, though you are free to imagine the possibilities.

Angelfish is quite thick, at over 14mm in cross-section (around the same as the Urbane LTE), likely owing to a larger battery necessitated by its LTE-ready chipset. The watch’s diameter is allegedly 43.5mm, making it substantially smaller than the “large” 46mm Moto 360, but still a bit bigger than the standard 42mm edition. We believe it will come in a matte dark gray finish that may be called “titanium,” but it’s unclear if other colors will be available. Angelfish will have GPS, LTE, and a heart-rate monitor, giving it the ability to be a true “standalone” Android Wear device. Remember,Google announced standalone Wear apps at I/O with with Wear 2.0.

The second, smaller watch is codenamedSwordfish. Speaking generally, Swordfish is reminiscent in basic shape to the Pebble Time Round, of course lacking the Round’s obviously massive screen bezel, and also using a different button arrangement. But the overall style of the body and especially the lug design are, in my opinion, quite similar. That said, because it doesn’t have the internal screen bezel, the portion of the body surrounding the watch face is larger, and the shape is more gentle and rounded than the Pebble.

Swordfish has a single button centered on the right-hand side of the body, with a more delicate and Apple Watch-like design. The center of the button cap appears to be polished metal, with the bezel of the crown being ridged. Aside from appearing more “raised” out of the body because of the watch’s circular shape, the button really is quite similar to the Apple Watch’s crown. Swordfish is smaller and thinner than Angelfish, with a body diameter of 42mm and a thickness of just 10.6mm – 0.8mm thinner than the current Moto 360. Granted, it still doesn’t have anything on the 7.5mm Pebble Time Round in this regard. Swordfish will allegedly be made available in three colors: silver, titanium, and rose gold. Swordfish lacks LTE or GPS, and it’s unclear if it has a heart rate monitor (we are leaning “no”).

It appears that, oddly, the larger Angelfish device will not support Google’s interchangeable MODE watch bands, because the design of the lugs and band won’t allow for it. Swordfish, on the other hand, will definitely be compatible with MODE bands.

Both watches will offer Google Assistant integration with contextual alerts. Exactly what that integration entails, we aren’t certain, but given Sundar Pichai’s comments about Nexus devices receiving more exclusive software features, we’re left wondering if these watches will get functionality other Android Wear devices won’t.

Google may also be working on a brand-new style of watch faces for these devices that will allowmuch quicker access to notifications, information, or media controls for apps or functions that you commonly use. This will likely be via the new app watchface integration announced as part of Wear 2.0. These quick-access functions would sit below the watch dial, presenting things like your current playback location in a song, the number of unread messages in Gmail, Hangouts unread counts, time in another time zone, the amount of time until your next calendar appointment, your number of steps, and more.

Google’s Project Soli: Radar Sensors read Finger Gestures

By |May 8th, 2016|Sensors|

Google’s Project Soli was one of the highlights of the company’s developer conference last year, but there’s been little news about it since then.

The technology uses special radar-sensors packed in a tiny chip to detect a person’s physical movements (such as rubbing two fingers together), letting a person do things like turn the volume up on a radio without actual touching anything. 

The recent news that Regina Dugan, the head of the Advanced Technology and Projects lab at Google that oversaw Soli, jumped ship to go work at rival Facebook, did not seem like a good sign for the future of Soli. And with Microsoft’s recent unveiling of similar technology, Google’s impressive product demo last year seemed like it might not make it out of the lab.

But it appears that Google is moving forward with the futuristic technology. 

Interest from commercial partners

A recent Google job posting seeking a software architect for the Soli effort notes that the technology has “attracted significant world-wide attention and interest from commercial partners,” and that Google is currently working hard to bring it to real world applications and devices.

The job posting also notes that the software architect will “drive and lead integration of Android Wear/Google Services with Soli technology.” 

separate posting for a Soli hardware engineer, also posted last week, cites responsibilities such as ” integrating Soli sensor into development platforms and proof-of-concept products.”

Meanwhile, FCC filings from earlier this year reveal that Google is continuing to distribute various test versions of the technology to third-party developers throughout the US. 

“Google continues to seek authority broad enough to allow testing of different chips, form factors, signal processing mechanisms, operating systems, and user interfaces and experiences for the Device and its new technology,” the filing reads. 

 Soli may not be ready for prime time yet, but Google does not appear to have given up on it. And with this year’s Google IO developer conference around the corner, the company may have more details to share about the product’s future.

http://flip.it/As_hQ

Google is quietly making progress on one of its most jaw-dropping tech projects

By |May 8th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Google is quietly making progress on one of its most jaw-dropping tech projects

http://flip.it/As_hQ

Google stated Happy & Expected Android Wear Response

By |September 8th, 2014|News, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, WEARABLE DEVICES|

Sounds like Google is Happy with the turn of Most EVERY Smartwatch mfg. to Android Wear OS.  

On a blog posted early this Sept month, Google stated they’d expected the such STRONG Android Wear adoption and we agreed.

Android Wear, moving forward like clockwork” by Google, Inc’s Blog

“First, we’re bringing offline music playback and GPS support to Android Wear. Go for a run or bike ride with your Android wearable and leave your phone at home. You’ll be able to listen to music stored on your watch via Bluetooth headphones. And if your watch includes a GPS sensor, you can track your distance and speed too.

The second update will enable downloadable watch faces, so you can customize the visual design of your watch’s home screen to show the information you want to see most—like your calendar or fitness sensors. Developers will soon be working on watch faces, making them available on Google Play. “

Google continued to go on by listing the upcoming smartwatches harboring the new ‘Android Wear OS’

“We’re also continuing to work with manufacturers to bring you even more watch options, with different shapes, styles and sensors.

  1. The Asus Zen Watch, coming later this year, includes a bio sensor, so you can keep tabs on your fitness and relaxation levels throughout the day.

    The LG G Watch R uses a circular display, includes a heart rate monitor, and will be available later this year.
    Last, but not least, we’re happy to welcome Sony to the Android Wear family with the Sony SmartWatch 3. It uses a transflective display for easier readability in sunlight, includes a GPS sensor, and will be available later this year.

    The Moto 360, the first Android wearable with a round display, is now available for sale in the U.S.

Read the complete version of Google September 5, 2014 post by following this link on their blog at http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2014/09/android-wear-moving-forward-like.html