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11 Wearables Stats that Will Blow You Away 

By |November 27th, 2016|Market Data, Outside Sources*, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, Statistics & Chartables, Uncategorized|

http://www.fool.com/investing/2016/11/24/11-wearables-stats-that-will-blow-you-away.aspx

Wearable devices are often considered the next major extension of mobile computing. However, many investors might not know much about this market beyond the Apple(NASDAQ:AAPL) Watch or Fitbit‘s (NYSE:FIT) fitness trackers. Therefore, let’s dig deeper into this growing market and discuss 11 fascinating stats about it.

Applewatch

THE APPLE WATCH. IMAGE SOURCE: APPLE.

1. IDC expects worldwide wearable shipments to rise 38% to 110 million this year and exceed 237 million by 2020. The research firm believes that growth will be driven by an expanding lineup of vendors, new form factors like clothing and eyewear, and growing consumer awareness.

2. That market could grow at a CAGR of 17.8% between 2015 and 2020 and be worth $31 billion at the end of that period, according to research firm Markets and Markets. The firm believes that within that, sales in the Americas will rise the fastest, fueled by increasing consumer demand and new medical applications.

3. 71% of 16 to 24 year olds want a wearable device, according to a survey by GlobalWebIndex. This supports the notion that most wearable users are young — a Nielsen survey in 2014 found that 48% of wearable users were between 18 and 34.

4. 69% of men are likely to buy a wearable device, compared to 54% of women, according to the GlobalWebIndex survey. This explains why several wearable leaders like Fitbit have released more fashion-friendly and feminine devices over the past year.

Fitbitalta

THE FITBIT ALTA. IMAGE SOURCE: FITBIT.

5. 29% of wearable buyers earn over $100,000 per year according to Nielsen. That explains why Apple heavily promoted the Apple Watch as a luxury product with high-end price points and positioned it as a fashionable device.

6. The Apple Watch controlled 41.3% of the smartwatch market in the third quarter according to IDC. However, that represents a big decline from its 70.2% share in the third quarter of 2015, and shipments fell 72% year-over-year.

7.Meanwhile, Garmin‘s (NASDAQ:GRMN) smartwatch shipments surged 324% annuallyduring the quarter, boosting its market share to 20.5% and making it the second largest smartwatch maker after Apple. That growth was attributed to the expansion of its ConnectIQ app ecosystem, its focus on health and fitness instead of a wide variety of activities, and its new high-end Fenix Chronos smartwatches.

Image

GARMIN’S FENIX CHRONOS. IMAGE SOURCE: GARMIN.

8. Fitbit remains the market leader in the overall (fitness trackers plus smartwatches) wearables market, with 25.4% market share during the second quarter according to IDC. It’s followed by Xiaomi, Apple, Garmin, and Lifesense — in that order. Fitbit’s shipments rose 29% annually during that quarter, giving it the second best growth rate after Garmin, which reported 107% shipments growth on strong sales of its smartwatches and Vivoactive fitness trackers.

9. Salesforce reports that over 20% of companies are testing out wearable devices in basic uses like security access, employee time management, and real-time employee communication. That bodes well for Fitbit, which already convinced many companies to participate in its corporate wellness programs to reduce health insurance costs.

10. The number one reason for buying a wearable device is health and fitness, according to PwC. This indicates that demand for fitness-oriented devices from Fitbit and Garmin might keep rising, but sales of multi-use smartwatches might wane.

11. 51% of respondents in a Rackspace survey stated that privacy was a major barrier in the adoption of wearable devices. The recent Mirai botnet attack targeting IoT devices and the surge in data breaches also might make consumers think twice before upgrading their watches, glasses, accessories, and clothing to their “smarter” versions.

The key takeaways

The tech industry clearly has high hopes for the wearables market, but it still faces a lot of hurdles ahead. Questions about practicality, privacy, and security will likely throttle market growth, while a flood of cheaper devices could commoditize the market. Nonetheless, investors interested in this market should keep following rising stars like Apple, Fitbit, and Garmin — and see which companies’ strategies attract more consumers in the long r

Global Smartwatch units Sold 2014-2018 (Statistic)

By |November 21st, 2016|Charts & Graphs, Outside Sources*, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, Statistics & Chartables, Uncategorized|

Statistic: Smartwatch unit sales worldwide from 2014 to 2018 (in millions) | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista

Smartwatch unit sales worldwide from 2014 to 2018 (in millions) The statistic shows forecast unit sales of smartwatches worldwide from 2014 to 2018. In 2018, sales of smartwatches are forecast to reach 141 million units. Unit sales in millions 5 19 38 75 141 2014 2015 2016* 2017* 2018* 0255075100125150175 Show further information

Source: • Global smartwatch unit sales 2014-2018 | Statistic

Global Wearables Shipment Forecast, by Device (Business Insider)

By |November 21st, 2016|Forecasts (In-Depth), Market Data, Outside Sources*, Sample Reports, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, Uncategorized|

This research report highlights the key features, forecasts, trends and market dynamics needed to spur adoption of wearable smartwatch devices.

Source: Smartwatch & Wearables Research: Forecasts, trends, market, use cases – Business Insider

Report: Smartwatch Sales not falling — Shipments Increase 60% year-on-year (IDC)

By |November 16th, 2016|Forecasts (In-Depth), Market Data, Outside Sources*, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, Uncategorized|

Are smartwatch sales tanking? Analysts are divided.

 A recent IDC report suggesting that smartwatch shipments plummeted by 50 percent over the past year has been rebuffed by rival analyst firm Canalys this week.


On the back of IDC’s claim that total shipments — the volume of devices sent to retailers to be sold on to consumers — dropped from 5.6 million in Q3 2015 to just 2.7 million in Q3 2016, Canalys argued that they actually rose 60 percent over the same period to reach 6.1 million shipments.

Both firms pegged Apple and the Apple Watch as the top seller — Canalys said 46 percent of shipments, IDC speculated 41 percent — but disagreed on who came next, and with what marketshare. Canalys rounded out its top five with Samsung (18 percent), Fitbit (17 percent), Garmin (three percent) and then Pebble (two percent); IDC went with Garmin (21 percent), Samsung (14 percent), Lenovo and Pebble (three percent each).

screenshot-2016-11-04-13-13-12

IDC used its data to assert that smartwatches “are not for everyone,” but Canalys is holding its judgement for another quarter. That’s because the firm believes that the incoming holiday season and the impact of the second-generation Apple Watch are two major factors that could indicate the current health and immediate future of smartwatches. Both firms agreed that pre-launch leaks of the Apple Watch 2 and the iterative updates made to the iPhone 7 may have impacted interest in and sales of the Apple Watch in the recent Q3 2016 period.

“The iPhone’s slowing momentum has affected consumer interest in Apple’s smart watch and the company needs to improve Watch sales in major markets outside of the US, especially China,” Canalys’ Jason Low said.

Interestingly, Low and colleagues found that China’s smartwatch market grew 42 percent year-on-year despite delays to Google’s Android Wear 2.0 platform and Samsung’s Gear S3, which is still to launch. Lower cost options, including those from Xiaomi partner Huami starting at $120, are seen as important to helping make smartwatches more affordable.

Meanwhile, Canalys reported that basic fitness band shipments grew 18 percent quarter-on-quarter to hit 11.5 million in Q3 2016.

“Together with smart watches, total wearable band shipments reached 17.6 million, signifying healthy year-on-year growth of 31 percent for the overall wearables market,” the firm added.

Aetna insurance will subsidize the Apple Watch

By |November 16th, 2016|Apple, HealthCare (mHealth & TeleHealth), Smart Watches|

http://money.cnn.com/2016/09/28/technology/aetna-apple-watch/

Aetna insurance will subsidize the Apple Watch

By Hope King September 28, 2016 10:13AM EDT

If you want an Apple Watch to keep track of your health, Aetna might help you pay for it.

The health insurance provider announced on Tuesday it will subsidize the cost of the device for some of its customers.

Aetna (AET) didn’t specify how much it would contribute to the cost, but noted it would be “a significant portion.”

The company highlighted in a statement it will be the first major healthcare insurance to offer such a programwhich begins this fall during open enrollment season.

There are no health requirements to qualify for the smartwatch, an Aetna spokesman told CNNMoney. Employers who use Aetna decide if they want to offer the Apple Watch program to employees.

The new Apple Watch Series 2 costs $369 for the aluminum body model and $549 for the stainless steel option. The Apple Watch Series 1 starts at $269.

Related: Apple Watch 2 — There’s finally a reason to buy a smartwatch

In addition to subsidizing the cost of the watch, Aetna will create several health apps for other iOS devices, such as the iPhone and iPad.

The apps will be released early next year and focus on helping people manage their medications, long-term care and insurance plans.

Apple (AAPLTech30) released a new version of its smartwatch earlier this month. Compared to the first generation, the Apple Watch 2 is geared much more toward fitness tracking.

The smartwatch is water resistant, so you can swim with it, and comes with built-in GPS. This means you no longer have to bring a phone with you on runs — it’ll track your routes remotely.

But unlike the Fitbit or Jawbone, the Apple Watch Series 2 doesn’t come with built-in sleep tracking. It’s a popular feature on other fitness devices and can help give you a bigger picture of your overall health.

Related: Hands on with the new Apple devices

Using personal gadgets to track health for insurance purposes is a growing trend.

In 2015, John Hancock started giving members a discount on life insurance if they shared health, location and body data, while Oscar Health offered its members a free Misfit fitness tracker

SmartWatch Market Declined 52% for Q3 2016. 

By |November 16th, 2016|Apple, Outside Sources*, REPORTS & ANALYSIS, Smart Watches, Uncategorized|

It seems like smartwatch fans are numbered.

Smartwatch sales declined 51.6% worldwide to 2.7 million in the third quarter, compared to 5.6 million shipments a year earlier, according to a new report published by International Data Analytics today (Oct. 24). Much of the downturn can be credited to the market leader, Apple, which saw sales of its Apple Watch plummet over 70% to 1.1 million.

With 41% of the market share, Apple is still leading. However, it’s a huge slip from the 72% it captured in the third quarter of 2015.

A big part of the issue for Apple is timing. The refreshed Apple Watch was released just two weeks before the end of the quarter, while the original watch debuted in May 2015. With “lower price points and improved experiences, Apple could be heading for a sequential rebound in 4Q16,” IDC wrote in its report.

Beyond Apple’s limited sales, Google and Samsung didn’t release wearables during the third quarter, which “left vendors relying on older, aging devices to satisfy customers,” noted Ramon Llamas, research manager for IDC’s Wearables team.

While devices like the Apple Watch come loaded with a variety of apps, the only clear use cases so far for such wearables are receiving notifications and tracking fitness activities. For some users, the former is less of a convenience and more of an anxiety-inducing function.

But health is showing showing real promise. Doctors have recommended that patients use fitness trackers, and, last month, Aetna Insurance announced plans to subsidize the Apple Watch for its customers.

For further proof that smartwatches are gaining traction as fitness devices, just look to Garmin. The company’s whopping 324% increase in sales from the year prior is “thanks to its growing list of ConnectIQ-enabled smartwatches and the addition of the fenix Chronos,” according to the report. Instead of trying to diversify into multi-purposes devices, like the Apple Watch, Garmin focused solely on health and fitness. The 600,000 units it shipped in the third quarter were second only to Apple.

Apple seems to be going in this direction as well, positioning the latest iterations of the Apple Watch to fitness aficionados with waterproofing, built-in GPS, and more health and fitness-oriented apps. There’s even the Apple Watch Nike+ aimed squarely at the running set.

All this represents a much more targeted audience than Apple typically goes after, but it could prove to be one that clearly sees the utility in a product that’s had trouble proving its worth

Cellular Smart Watches Forecast (2016-2020)

By |August 6th, 2016|Charts & Graphs, Forecasts (In-Depth), Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, Standalone, WEARABLE DEVICES|

Google building two Android Wear Smartwatches integrating Google Assistant

By |July 7th, 2016|PRODUCT RUMORS, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES|

Speaking to Android Police, a reliable source has told us that Google is currently building two Android Wear devices – possibly Nexus-branded – for release some time after the latest Nexus phones are announced. One watch will be larger, sportier, and more fully-featured (LTE, GPS, heart rate), the other will be smaller and lack the aforementioned mobile data and GPS.

This rumor a confidence level of 9 out of 10;We are extremely confident Google is in the process of prototyping these in-house Wear devices, and have confirmation of their existence from multiple sources. We are subtracting a point from our confidence because of the ongoing development occurring for these devices, and the possibility that they may change or that one or both may be cancelled (or delayed), as well as the fact that we are unable to share our primary source information for this post.

There also remains some ambiguity about the codenames I will use for these watches, and whether or not these names are currently being used, so consider them nothing more than easy ways to refer back to either device at this point.

The evidence

As I said, we are unable to share any direct evidence of the existence of these devices at this time. However, because of the quality of our source, we feel confident in publishing information about these devices, including descriptions of their respective appearances. To ensure we are clear on one thing before we start: the hero image of this post is 100% a fabrication [hopefully obviously, because my talentless ass made it] and has no resemblance to either watch. So, let’s get started.

Both watches have full circular displays. We do not believe either will have “flat tires.” Let’s start with the larger watch, which we believe to be codenamed Angelfish.

Angelfish bears some resemblance to the current Moto 360 and LG’s Urbane 2nd Edition LTE, but is distinct from both. The design has visible lugs, with a smooth housing shape that curves where the watch band meets the body. It does not have the stark circular “puck” shape of Motorola’s 360, nor the rather angular lugs or multi-piece design of the Urbane LTE. This gives the watch a subdued but sporty look. Angelfish has three buttons. Looking at the watch face, one large circular crown button is centered along the right side of the body, with two smaller and shorter circular buttons above and below it. It is unclear what these secondary buttons are for at this time, though you are free to imagine the possibilities.

Angelfish is quite thick, at over 14mm in cross-section (around the same as the Urbane LTE), likely owing to a larger battery necessitated by its LTE-ready chipset. The watch’s diameter is allegedly 43.5mm, making it substantially smaller than the “large” 46mm Moto 360, but still a bit bigger than the standard 42mm edition. We believe it will come in a matte dark gray finish that may be called “titanium,” but it’s unclear if other colors will be available. Angelfish will have GPS, LTE, and a heart-rate monitor, giving it the ability to be a true “standalone” Android Wear device. Remember,Google announced standalone Wear apps at I/O with with Wear 2.0.

The second, smaller watch is codenamedSwordfish. Speaking generally, Swordfish is reminiscent in basic shape to the Pebble Time Round, of course lacking the Round’s obviously massive screen bezel, and also using a different button arrangement. But the overall style of the body and especially the lug design are, in my opinion, quite similar. That said, because it doesn’t have the internal screen bezel, the portion of the body surrounding the watch face is larger, and the shape is more gentle and rounded than the Pebble.

Swordfish has a single button centered on the right-hand side of the body, with a more delicate and Apple Watch-like design. The center of the button cap appears to be polished metal, with the bezel of the crown being ridged. Aside from appearing more “raised” out of the body because of the watch’s circular shape, the button really is quite similar to the Apple Watch’s crown. Swordfish is smaller and thinner than Angelfish, with a body diameter of 42mm and a thickness of just 10.6mm – 0.8mm thinner than the current Moto 360. Granted, it still doesn’t have anything on the 7.5mm Pebble Time Round in this regard. Swordfish will allegedly be made available in three colors: silver, titanium, and rose gold. Swordfish lacks LTE or GPS, and it’s unclear if it has a heart rate monitor (we are leaning “no”).

It appears that, oddly, the larger Angelfish device will not support Google’s interchangeable MODE watch bands, because the design of the lugs and band won’t allow for it. Swordfish, on the other hand, will definitely be compatible with MODE bands.

Both watches will offer Google Assistant integration with contextual alerts. Exactly what that integration entails, we aren’t certain, but given Sundar Pichai’s comments about Nexus devices receiving more exclusive software features, we’re left wondering if these watches will get functionality other Android Wear devices won’t.

Google may also be working on a brand-new style of watch faces for these devices that will allowmuch quicker access to notifications, information, or media controls for apps or functions that you commonly use. This will likely be via the new app watchface integration announced as part of Wear 2.0. These quick-access functions would sit below the watch dial, presenting things like your current playback location in a song, the number of unread messages in Gmail, Hangouts unread counts, time in another time zone, the amount of time until your next calendar appointment, your number of steps, and more.

Sony's New e-Paper based Smartwatch is the FES WATCH

By |December 1st, 2014|Consumer Wearables, News, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES|

FEZ Fashion EntertainmentsTwo days ago, we heard of Sony’s plans to build a watch made entirely of e-paper — one where the band and the watch face would both change in response to the user’s wrist gestures. It sounded wild and provocatively different, but what we really wanted to know was what it looked like. As it turns out, that watch is already in the public eye, though Sony’s involvement had until now been kept clandestine so as to judge the product on its own merits.

Say hello to the FES Watch.

 

feswatch.0.0

 

 

FES Watch Hands-On

 

 

The Wall Street Journal reports that the Fashion Entertainments startup behind that crowdfunded watch is in fact a subdivision of Sony, tasked with designing and experimenting with products that can define the next evolution in personal electronic devices.

The watch is extremely thin and makes no pretense of being smart, relying on the chameleonic flexibility of its appearance and a clean minimalist shape to win over fans. Because it has no sophisticated electronics inside, it’s also said to last as long as 60 days on a single button battery.

 

Sony isn’t limiting the usage of e-paper to Smartwatches. The Japanese company is experimenting with bow ties, paper holders, and more (see videos below).

Coming back to the FES Watch, the gadget doesn’t have a definite release date as of yet.  However, the crowdfunded project, hosted on Japanese crowdfunding platform ‘Makuake‘, says that the watch will be available around May 2015.

Smartwatches “a niche opportunity at best"

By |November 11th, 2014|Forecasts (In-Depth), Market Data, News, REPORTS & ANALYSIS, Smart Watches, SMARTWATCHES, Statistics & Chartables|

Smartwatches are “a niche opportunity at best” and face an uphill struggle to interest the general public – though Apple could change that if it enters the market, a new study has found.

A report by US-based Jackdaw Research surveyed 2,200 US and UK consumers, concluding that there is limited consumer interest in “push” notifications – the main function offered by smartwatches such as the Pebble and Android Wear devices like Samsung’s Gear Live offer.

The survey points to continuing problems with the wearables market, where products such as Google Glass have so far failed to ignite consumer interest, and devices such as fitness trackers show high rates of abandonment.

Smartwatches’ key capability is to notify the wearer on their wrist of information from apps on their phone, via a Bluetooth connection. They can vibrate or display a message on the screen. Users can typically dismiss the alert with a swipe, or in some devices dictate a response via voice dictation.

But Jan Dawson, chief analyst at Jackdaw, says that the appeal of smartwatches rests on how many notifications people are interested in receiving, and whether they can or want to respond to them.

That, the survey found, is very limited.

Carried out online and adjusted for demographic profiles, the survey found that most people only choose to get one or two groups of notifications, such as text messages and emails, on the screen of their phone when it is locked.

Overall, 24% were set up with no notifications at all, 33% from just one app, 15% from two, and 28% from more than two.

Seen in the broader context of the US, where the survey reckons only 50% of adults have a smartphone, that means that only 22% of the overall population use notifications from two or more apps – suggesting a limited market for smartwatches based around push notifications at the outset.

Most people don’t use push notifications on their phone
Most people don’t use ‘push’ notifications on their phone screen – suggesting that smartwatches, which are based on pushing information, will struggle

——

Photograph: /PR/Jackdaw Research

“We believe that a notification-centric smartwatch experience is only likely to be attractive to people who actively use push notifications for more than two apps,” notes Dawson. “Otherwise, the main function of the watch will remain dormant for much of the day.”

But because typical notifications – text messages and emails – need the user to respond, “the current crop of smartwatches, which don’t provide good response capabilities to such messages, are not a good fit for those [functions] either.”

Poor battery life and response functions
He notes that some people who don’t currently use push notifications might do so if they got a smartwatch, and points to anecdotal information that some people don’t use push notifications because they require them to get their phone out of a pocket. “However, we believe this number is small, and therefore the effect limited,” Dawson notes.

Other problems include limited battery life, which is less than two days for most current models, as well as the problem of responding to notifications that appear on the smartwatch, the size and lack of attractiveness of current offerings, and display quality, says Dawson.

Google showed off its Android Wear software for smartwatches amid great excitement at its I/O conference in June, with attendees receiving a free smartwatch provided by LG or Samsung. New models are expected from Motorola within weeks, and Taiwan’s HTC is widely rumoured to be preparing to enter the fray.

Beyond Samsung, there are a number of other smartwatch makers, including US-based Pebble, launched by a $10m Kickstarter campaign in 2012.

NPD data says that Samsung and Pebble presently dominate the market, with 78% and 18% of sales respectively in the US between October 2013 and May 2014.

However Dawson cautions that hardware vendors should cut back on their investment in the space: “Market growth and the overall revenue opportunity remain poor,” he says.

He suggests would-be new entrants should be cautious about Android Wear, which offers limited chances to tailor its appearance or function, and so risks any hardware running it becoming a commodity: “We would advise most would-be vendors to stay out of the market,” he says, while saying that those who continue should aim to be cross-platform, working with Android and Apple’s iOS.

Time for Apple?
But if Apple decides to enter the wearables field, as has been widely rumoured though not confirmed, this could transform the situation, the report says. Unconfirmed reports have suggested that Apple is partnering with Swatch, or might introduce an “iTime”.

Dawson says: “Two major things could catalyse demand in this market: a player overcoming the significant technological challenges associated with the current smartwatch model, or a player which breaks the model and reinvents the category. Apple seems the likeliest company to do either of these things, and we believe that its entry – likely in late 2014 or early 2015 – will catalyse the market and drive much more rapid growth.”

He thinks that Apple will do “something completely different” – perhaps with a device lacking a screen, or in multiple forms to be worn on different parts of the body.

But he adds that “if Apple is able to create significant innovation in its product, most of the benefits may accrue to Apple itself, with a minimal halo effect [benefitting other vendors] on other vendors.”

Dawson warns that Apple’s arrival, if it happens, “may be a double-edged sword for existing vendors, at best” because it could dominate the market for iPhones, which make up 40% of smartphones in use in the US.

One possible use for a wearable device is for mobile payments, where people pay in a store using their mobile phone via systems such as NFC – which Apple has been rumoured to be investigating. But that too is a limited market: only 9% of adults said in the survey that they “use it all the time”, while 64% said they had never used it, and 10% had tried it once.

“Any smartwatch that incorporates mobile payments cannot simply continue to plough the same furrow as previous systems have,” the report notes, but must have far greater ease of use. It also has to contend with the lack of compatible systems in stores – “one of the biggest barriers to adoption today” – which creates a chicken-and-egg problem.

The survey also found that 80% of the population has never tried a fitness tracker such as the Fitbit, even though they have been available for more than five years.

The main users are in the 18-24 age group, but they have a high abandonment rate, with only 20% of respondents having tried one – of whom 45% (or 9% of the overall population) had given up using them.

Dawson points out that smartwatches can incorporate fitness tracking – but on the evidence that fitness trackers are being abandoned by consumers, that isn’t sufficient cause to drive sales given that trackers typically cost far less than $100, while smartwatches are pricier. Smartwatches can, though, incorporate many functions.
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